On the Air

Link

Here’s something a little different: a radio interview with my good friend, L. Jaye Bell. I was delighted to be L. Jaye’s first guest in 2013 on her program Destination Maine. I hope you’ll enjoy listening. I see it’s not showing up as a link, so please copy and paste it!

http://destinationmaineradioshow.blogspot.com/2013/01/january-11-2013-beverly-scott.html

Best wishes for a productive and stretching year ahead,

Beverly

Unselfconsciousness

This video makes me smile.

As you watch it, you might ask yourself a few questions:

Are these people doing what they’re doing “perfectly” or are they willing simply to do it and have a good time?

Are they polished, flawless and impressive? Or happy, free and focussed?

Do they appear to worry about what people think of them?

If they make a mistake, do they look fretful or do they just move forward and get on with the dance?

Can you approach your next presentation with the same openness and joy these people embrace?

(Answer: yes, you can.)

What have you done lately that expresses freedom, confidence and connection?

Is this you?

I hope not. But if it is, take heart. There is a way to quiet your mind, calm your nerves, settle your body, control your message and (I’m not kidding) be yourself when you are in front of an audience. Did I mention that you can actually ENJOY the experience, too?

My 5-week Free Your Talents class, “Presentation Skills for Professionals” still has some spaces available. I hope you’ll enroll right now. Here are the details:

Thursday evenings, 5:30 to 8:30 pm, beginning May 10, 2012. Lord Camden Inn, Camden, Maine. Value: $650. Regular price: $350. Spring Special: $250. A $50 deposit holds your place in this fun, stretching, informative, practical, freeing class. Now’s the time, friends. Take this class. Write or call: beverly@freeyourtalents.com; 207-230-0272.

You can change the way you feel about being in front of a group. Save money, time and energy by practicing the principles I will teach you in class. 

Learn to be yourself while people are watching.

Yours in freedom and clarity,

Beverly

“I didn’t quite expect to see someone so articulate.”

Although I don’t advocate air travel in the buff, here’s an intriguing story about a man who is not ashamed to bare all for the sake of protest:

http://www.katu.com/news/local/Stripping-naked-at-airport-was-the-right-thing-to-do-man-says-148021025.html.

I love his sincere statement: “I’m not ashamed of my body.” How many people are that unselfconscious about their bodies even when clothed?

The anchor’s remark about being surprised that John Brennan is “so articulate” reveals (!) one thing: it is typical in our culture to judge people by the way they look.

With that in mind, I encourage you to learn from John Brennan’s calm focus for your next speaking engagement.

While you’re at it, I also hope you’ll dress appropriately — just a notch up from the way your audience is dressed. (If they’re wearing nothing at all, for instance, please don a scarf or a tie.)

Until next time,

Beverly

 

 

Um

[For reasons unknown to me, I cannot get the usual spacing between paragraphs in this post. I don't like the way this looks, but here's today's offering, anyhow.]

Is it a word: um? I’ve just visited Webster’s online dictionary and see this:

Definition of UM

—used to indicate hesitation <well, um, I don’t know>
“Um” is an interjection. It doesn’t tell us what, where or how something is, give a sense of action or purpose, nor does it offer clarity. It’s a filler, a place taker, and indicates that we’re lost, confused, puzzled and most likely uncomfortable. When you use “um” a lot, people lose interest. It’s a habit well dismissed.
A pause is more effective than mindlessly “um”-ing and will help you get back on track. Rather than fill the air with “um” (or “uh,” “welllllll,” “aaaaand,” “hmm,” or “y’know”), just be still. Be quiet a second. Breathe in. Pay attention to what you want to say. Then say it. Let the “um” go away. It’s not a helpful utterance.
Start to notice “um” in your conversations and presentations. Then, pause instead before you continue speaking. You’ll feel clearer, and your listeners will follow you much more easily. I think you’ll find that you communicate much better without “um.”
Isn’t that a happy thought?
Beverly

Who determines how well you perform in front of a group?

“I’m fine talking to people I work with; they already know my flaws so it’s no big deal if they see me goof up. It’s when I’m in front of strangers that I freak out.”

“Give me a group of people I don’t know; they’ll never see me again so I don’t really care. Make me speak to coworkers and I fall apart; they’ll hammer me!”

“I don’t mind talking to an audience of under a hundred people; once it gets over 100, I’m a nervous wreck.”

“Big crowds don’t bother me; hey, I can’t even see who’s out there. But if there are only 10 or 20 listeners, I get all fidgety, sweat like crazy and can’t remember what I want to say.”

On it goes. People can be amazed that other folks don’t share their specific worries regarding audiences. It all boils down to this question: “Do your listeners actually determine whether or not you can feel at ease, clear-minded and capable?”

(Answer: They don’t.)

Beverly