Unselfconsciousness

This video makes me smile.

As you watch it, you might ask yourself a few questions:

Are these people doing what they’re doing “perfectly” or are they willing simply to do it and have a good time?

Are they polished, flawless and impressive? Or happy, free and focussed?

Do they appear to worry about what people think of them?

If they make a mistake, do they look fretful or do they just move forward and get on with the dance?

Can you approach your next presentation with the same openness and joy these people embrace?

(Answer: yes, you can.)

What have you done lately that expresses freedom, confidence and connection?

Umission: supporting you having a wonderful life


What an honor to have been selected as Umission’s Person of the Week.

http://umission.com/person-of-the-week/beverly-scott/

Here’s to freedom,

Beverly

Is this you?

I hope not. But if it is, take heart. There is a way to quiet your mind, calm your nerves, settle your body, control your message and (I’m not kidding) be yourself when you are in front of an audience. Did I mention that you can actually ENJOY the experience, too?

My 5-week Free Your Talents class, “Presentation Skills for Professionals” still has some spaces available. I hope you’ll enroll right now. Here are the details:

Thursday evenings, 5:30 to 8:30 pm, beginning May 10, 2012. Lord Camden Inn, Camden, Maine. Value: $650. Regular price: $350. Spring Special: $250. A $50 deposit holds your place in this fun, stretching, informative, practical, freeing class. Now’s the time, friends. Take this class. Write or call: beverly@freeyourtalents.com; 207-230-0272.

You can change the way you feel about being in front of a group. Save money, time and energy by practicing the principles I will teach you in class. 

Learn to be yourself while people are watching.

Yours in freedom and clarity,

Beverly

In case you haven’t heard . . .

My Free Your Talents Mini-Course is on its way:

You can feel comfortable, relaxed, natural and confident when you stand before an audience. On Sunday, April 29, 2012, from 4:00 to 6:00 pm., at the Lord Camden Inn in downtown Camden, Maine, I will teach a “Free Your Talents” mini-course. This two-hour session will explore the principles of confident communication and how to implement them naturally and effectively in your life.
If you seek freedom and ease in presenting ideas or abilities to others, come join us on April 29th. Admission is $10 for the public, $5 for Chamber of Commerce members, so bring your friends for a fun and informative session.
Please contact me at 230-0272 or beverly@freeyourtalents.com to reserve your place in this fun and informative mini-course.
Free your talents: be yourself while people are watching.
Hope to see you on April 29th.
Beverly

A little girl faces down fear

Today I saw this clip posted on a friend’s Facebook wall. I had to view it numerous times because it demonstrates so clearly the power of pressing on right through great fear. I hope you will watch it and listen well.

Fear of speaking to an audience does not hold the potential physical risks this child’s activity did. However, if you feel as paralyzed and terrorized by fear as she did, take heart from her example. Learn from her experience.

Focus. Engage. Enlist. Intend. Breathe. Move.

Getting on with it opens the way to feeling free and comfortable — or even thrilled — and your next step will invite even greater freedom.

Yours in fearlessness,

Beverly

Forgot your password?

Logging in to my System Preferences this morning, I typed my user name and password. A message proclaimed that my password was incorrect. Impossible! I typed it again. Same message. Then again: Incorrect password. “WHAT?! This cannot be! I know this password is correct.”

In fact, the password was correct. Suddenly I noticed that I had (too speedily) typed my user name improperly. Aha, there was the culprit. I straightened that out, entered the password and, voila, all was well.

Too often it’s easy to get all hung up on what’s wrong, when it’s not the thing that’s wrong at all. When you’re speaking to an audience, you might think, “Oh, yikes, there’s my supervisor, Judith, out there. I’m so nervous because she’s looking at me.” Hmm. It’s not your supervisor’s presence that’s giving you the shakes; it’s your thoughts turning inward toward yourself that are making you so uncomfortable. Just as I was thinking my password entry was misbehaving when it wasn’t, you’re letting Judith’s presence be a problem when it’s not. In fact, Judith may well be delighted with what she’s hearing you say. You need to refocus your thoughts on what matters: your audience (including Judith) and their need to hear your message. Then get on with your presentation.

Keep your eyes on what matters!

Onward.

Beverly

 

F E A R

The muscular man strode to the front of the room. His buzz cut hair, piercing blue eyes and no-nonsense manner reminded us with each presentation that he meant business. A Viet Nam veteran a generation older than most of my other university public speaking students, he always seemed a bit distant and harsh. I was a little scared of him; the other students generally avoided him.

On the flip chart he wrote four bold letters in a vertical column:

F

E

A

R

Looking at each of us before he spoke, he breathed deeply. Then, in military manner, he told us that he was sure we had experienced fear. He affirmed that he, too, had known fear, giving several vivid examples from his time in service. Not clear where his speech was leading, I glanced around at his fellow students and saw unsure, sober faces.

“Now, I’m gonna tell you what fear really is,” he barked:

False

Evidence

Appearing

Real

His tone softened. His voice quieted. He explained that fear cannot govern us if we don’t let it because it isn’t true; we need to look beyond fear to find strength; we can feel loved rather than be afraid.

When he returned to his seat, the silence that had minutes before been one of trepidation had become one of trust and assurance, comfort and amazement.

False evidence no longer appeared real.