On the Air

Link

Here’s something a little different: a radio interview with my good friend, L. Jaye Bell. I was delighted to be L. Jaye’s first guest in 2013 on her program Destination Maine. I hope you’ll enjoy listening. I see it’s not showing up as a link, so please copy and paste it!

http://destinationmaineradioshow.blogspot.com/2013/01/january-11-2013-beverly-scott.html

Best wishes for a productive and stretching year ahead,

Beverly

Unselfconsciousness

This video makes me smile.

As you watch it, you might ask yourself a few questions:

Are these people doing what they’re doing “perfectly” or are they willing simply to do it and have a good time?

Are they polished, flawless and impressive? Or happy, free and focussed?

Do they appear to worry about what people think of them?

If they make a mistake, do they look fretful or do they just move forward and get on with the dance?

Can you approach your next presentation with the same openness and joy these people embrace?

(Answer: yes, you can.)

What have you done lately that expresses freedom, confidence and connection?

Stick the landing

What message from years of training do you suppose inspires an Olympic athlete about to complete a routine before the crowd goes wild with delight?

“Stick the landing!”

No matter how the performance has gone thus far, the final moment is vital. Stick the landing! Make it solid, strong, secure. Express the best stance. Look outward and upward. Give your audience that final impression of completeness. Hold that pose with focus and energy before you leave.

As in gymnastics, so in presenting. In addition to knowing what you should do when you complete a presentation, it’s good to know what not to do. Here are some things to avoid:

http://www.ragan.com/Main/Articles/45191.aspx

Enjoy the Olympics. Enjoy speaking. And always stick the landing.

What are some ways you have found helpful when you complete your presentations to hold your listeners’ attention?

Until next time,

Beverly

 

Umission: supporting you having a wonderful life


What an honor to have been selected as Umission’s Person of the Week.

http://umission.com/person-of-the-week/beverly-scott/

Here’s to freedom,

Beverly

“Solutionaries” — an excellent subject presented with naturalness, freedom and focus

Here is a TED talk that’s got everything good going for it:

I love the way Zoe expresses her passion for her subject with calm clarity, vision, humor, originality and assurance.

What else keeps you watching her presentation?

Until next time,

Beverly

“Celebrate your freedom from self-consciousness!”

     I’m offering a 2-hour Mini-Course, co-sposored by the Camden Public Library. “Celebrate your freedom from self-consciousness!” on Monday, July 2, 2012, from 2 to 4 pm, in the library’s Jean Picker Room.
     If you’re ever in a situation in which people are watching you — presenting to a group, playing a sport, performing on a stage, or even just standing around at a party — and you feel awkward about it, come discover ways to address and eliminate that discomfort. Find tools to redirect your energy, get your thought off yourself, appreciate your audience, and feel a sense of calm assurance, poise and naturalness.
     In honor of Independence Day, this mini-course is offered FREE of charge. I would appreciate knowing how many visitors to expect, so please RSVP with the number of guests you plan to take on Monday, July 2nd, from 2 to 4 pm: beverly@freeyourtalents.com.
     Hope to hear from you soon and to see you there!
     Until next time,
     Beverly


Is this you?

I hope not. But if it is, take heart. There is a way to quiet your mind, calm your nerves, settle your body, control your message and (I’m not kidding) be yourself when you are in front of an audience. Did I mention that you can actually ENJOY the experience, too?

My 5-week Free Your Talents class, “Presentation Skills for Professionals” still has some spaces available. I hope you’ll enroll right now. Here are the details:

Thursday evenings, 5:30 to 8:30 pm, beginning May 10, 2012. Lord Camden Inn, Camden, Maine. Value: $650. Regular price: $350. Spring Special: $250. A $50 deposit holds your place in this fun, stretching, informative, practical, freeing class. Now’s the time, friends. Take this class. Write or call: beverly@freeyourtalents.com; 207-230-0272.

You can change the way you feel about being in front of a group. Save money, time and energy by practicing the principles I will teach you in class. 

Learn to be yourself while people are watching.

Yours in freedom and clarity,

Beverly

‎”Finally, in conclusion, let me say just this.”

This quotation from Peter Sellers makes me laugh.

This type of ending to a presentation does not.

When you are ready to wrap up your talk, do it. Avoid prolonging it with statements like, “Without further ado,” “To make a long story short,” or even “In conclusion.” Why not? They have become trite fillers, fall-back remarks that can take away from the naturalness and sincerity of your message. They seem to indicate, “I don’t know what else to say now, so I’ll just say this.” Find a fresh way to let your listeners know that you are nearing the end, and then go there.

Restating your main points is helpful to your audience, a brief recap of what you’ve given them. You can say something like, “Let’s go over those points one more time,” or something else that indicates the conclusion is imminent. Giving them something to do (sometimes referred to as the “call to action”) will help you leave on a strong note.

Then, when you’ve stopped talking, stand still and be quiet for a thoughtful moment. Just as an Olympic gymnast sticks the landing upon completing a routine, you, too, can take a few seconds to stay connected with what you’ve offered. This allows your listeners to ponder what you’ve just said. It keeps them focussed not on YOU, but on your message to THEM. This is the best way to end your presentation.

Here’s to poised completion,

Beverly

A little girl faces down fear

Today I saw this clip posted on a friend’s Facebook wall. I had to view it numerous times because it demonstrates so clearly the power of pressing on right through great fear. I hope you will watch it and listen well.

Fear of speaking to an audience does not hold the potential physical risks this child’s activity did. However, if you feel as paralyzed and terrorized by fear as she did, take heart from her example. Learn from her experience.

Focus. Engage. Enlist. Intend. Breathe. Move.

Getting on with it opens the way to feeling free and comfortable — or even thrilled — and your next step will invite even greater freedom.

Yours in fearlessness,

Beverly

5 Reasons people look at you at the gym

I like this item from my friend Barbara Rocha’s blog so much, that I asked her if I could feature it in mine. You can enjoy her blog here: http://gettingoveryourself.wordpress.com/

5 Reasons people look at you at the gym 

It’s so easy to think everyone is paying attention to us, especially when we’re giving a speech. But what about at the gym? Yes, even there. But is that what they’re really doing?

These are the 5 reasons people look at you at the gym, and the first four are the most likely.

1. They’re staring into space in your direction and don’t even see you.

2. They’re really looking in the mirror at themselves.

3. They’re checking out the exercise you’re doing to see if it’s something they ought to add to their workout.

4. They’re wondering when you’ll be through with that machine.

And a very distant 5. They’re actually interested in you. In which case, make the most of it. (And even there, they’re thinking about themselves.)

So, whether you’re giving a speech or working out, it’ll be much easier once you figure out the audience is more interested in themselves than they are in you. Make the most of it. And set yourself free.

Yours in getting over yourself,

Beverly

P.S. If you liked this, you’ll also like Barb’s book, Getting Over Yourself – A Guide to Painless Public Speaking . . . and More, which you can purchase directly from her: http://gettingoveryourself.com/publications/index.htm