Umission: supporting you having a wonderful life


What an honor to have been selected as Umission’s Person of the Week.

http://umission.com/person-of-the-week/beverly-scott/

Here’s to freedom,

Beverly

Attention! Attention!

Getting and holding your audience’s attention is one important thing that makes your presentation a presentation (and not just another rehearsal).

Here’s a helpful clip on this subject. I wish I could find the name of the man who is speaking so that I can give him credit directly.

Doesn’t he come across in a natural, uncomplicated way? I like watching him and I like listening to him. I hope you do, too.

http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-hold-an-audience-attention

What are some ways you have garnered your audience’s attention — and held onto it?

Until next time,

Beverly

“I didn’t quite expect to see someone so articulate.”

Although I don’t advocate air travel in the buff, here’s an intriguing story about a man who is not ashamed to bare all for the sake of protest:

http://www.katu.com/news/local/Stripping-naked-at-airport-was-the-right-thing-to-do-man-says-148021025.html.

I love his sincere statement: “I’m not ashamed of my body.” How many people are that unselfconscious about their bodies even when clothed?

The anchor’s remark about being surprised that John Brennan is “so articulate” reveals (!) one thing: it is typical in our culture to judge people by the way they look.

With that in mind, I encourage you to learn from John Brennan’s calm focus for your next speaking engagement.

While you’re at it, I also hope you’ll dress appropriately — just a notch up from the way your audience is dressed. (If they’re wearing nothing at all, for instance, please don a scarf or a tie.)

Until next time,

Beverly

 

 

Um

[For reasons unknown to me, I cannot get the usual spacing between paragraphs in this post. I don't like the way this looks, but here's today's offering, anyhow.]

Is it a word: um? I’ve just visited Webster’s online dictionary and see this:

Definition of UM

—used to indicate hesitation <well, um, I don’t know>
“Um” is an interjection. It doesn’t tell us what, where or how something is, give a sense of action or purpose, nor does it offer clarity. It’s a filler, a place taker, and indicates that we’re lost, confused, puzzled and most likely uncomfortable. When you use “um” a lot, people lose interest. It’s a habit well dismissed.
A pause is more effective than mindlessly “um”-ing and will help you get back on track. Rather than fill the air with “um” (or “uh,” “welllllll,” “aaaaand,” “hmm,” or “y’know”), just be still. Be quiet a second. Breathe in. Pay attention to what you want to say. Then say it. Let the “um” go away. It’s not a helpful utterance.
Start to notice “um” in your conversations and presentations. Then, pause instead before you continue speaking. You’ll feel clearer, and your listeners will follow you much more easily. I think you’ll find that you communicate much better without “um.”
Isn’t that a happy thought?
Beverly